Enfield Bomb Map 1944 / 1945

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V1 Flying Bomb strikes 1944

The first V-1 flying bomb launched at London was on 13th June 1944 landing in Mile End and killing eight people. Within three days Enfield was hit by its’ first V-1. Over the next ten months Enfield was hit by forty one flying bombs and twenty six ballistic missiles. The last hit to land on Enfield (a V2) did so on March 27th 1945, just days before the war in Europe ended. The rocket partly broke up, landing in pieces between Chingford and Montagu Road. One person was killed near Edmonton Green. The last rocket to hit England struck later that same day in Kent and the last flying bomb of the war was shot down two days later. The V weapon campaign was over. The war in Europe ended just a few weeks later. The list below is of the V weapons that hit Enfield.

V1 Flying Bomb strikes

1944
(1) June 16th Fernley Hill Farm
(2) June 18th King George Reservoir
(3) June 25th Baker Street
(4) June 27th Chesterfield Road
(5) June 28th Factory, Edmonton
(6) June 30th Trent Park
(7) July 1st Bullsmoor Way
(8) July 1st Avenue Road, Southgate
(9) July 1st New Reservoir
(10) July 2nd Trent Park
(11) July 7th Carpenter Gardens
(12) July 10th Trent Park
(13) July 19th Bullsmoor Lane
(14) July 19th Grove Road & High Road
(15) July 19th Morton Way
(16) July 20th Gasworks, Edmonton
(17) July 20th Field, Ladysmith Road
(18) July 20th Marrilyne Avenue
(19) July 20th Weir Hall allotments
(20) July 22nd Brimsdown Station
(21) July 24th Montagu Road
(22) July 24th Brimsdown
(23) July 25th St Mary’s Road
(24) July 25th Huxley Parade
(25) Aug 2nd Kenninghall Road
(26) Aug 3rd Durants Road
(27) Aug 15th Vault Hill Wood
(28) Aug 15th Ridgeway Country Club
(29) Aug 17th Ridge Crest, Ridgeway
(30) Aug 23rd Hadley Wood
(31) Aug 24th Holmwood Road
(32) Aug 24th Groveland Park
(33) Aug 29th Broad Walk
(34) Aug 29th New Reservoir
(35) Aug 30th Scotland Green Road
(36) Sept 22nd Cotswold Way
(37) Sept 25th Holly Hill Farm
(38) Sept 27th Woodgrange Gardens
(39) Oct 18th Fore St. / Fairfield Rd.
1945
(40) Jan 14th Whitewebbs Lane
(41) March 5th Whitewebbs Road

V2 Ballistic Missile strikes

1944
(1) Sept 16th Tewkesbury Terrace
(2) Oct 26th Palmers Green Station
(3) Nov 15th Ringwood Way
(4) Nov 27th King George Reservoir
(5) Nov 29th Eastbournia Avenue
(6) Dec 1st Broadlands Avenue
(7) Dec 9th Abbey Road
(8) Dec 14th Brownlow Road
(9) Dec 31st Whitewebbs Golf Course
1945
(10) Jan 3rd Park Ave, Bush Hill Park
(11) Jan 7th Edmonton Gas Works
(12) Jan 10th Cuckoo Hall Lane
(13) Jan 13th Crews Hill
(14) Jan 23rd Angel Road
(15) Jan 24th Holly Hill Farm
(16) Jan 24th Enfield Crematorium
(17) Jan 25th Gordon Hill
(18) Feb 1st New Reservoir
(19) Feb 20th New Reservoir
(20) Feb 28th New Reservoir
(21) March 3rd Wilbury Way / Bull Lane
(22) March 4th New Reservoir
(23) March 7th Angel Road rail line
(24) March 10th Great Cambridge Road
(25) March 25th Mapleton Road
(26) March 27th Montagu Road

The above list covers the modern Borough of Enfield which, in 1944/1945, was made up of three smaller district
boroughs – Enfield, Southgate and Edmonton – as well as a very small part of Chingford district.

The attacks on Enfield.

The first V-1 flying bomb launched at London was on 13th June 1944 landing in Mile End and killing eight people. Within three days Enfield was hit by its’ first V-1. Over the next ten months Enfield was hit by forty one flying bombs and twenty six ballistic missiles.The last V weapon to land on Enfield did so on March 27th 1945, just days before the war in Europe ended. The V2 rocket partly broke up as it came in. Landing in pieces between Chingford and Montagu Road in Edmonton. One person was killed near Edmonton Green. The last rocket to hit England struck later that same day in Kent and the last flying bomb of the war was shot down two days later. The V weapon campaign was over. The war in Europe ended just a few weeks later.

The V1 and V2 strikes in Enfield killed at least 100 people and injured many hundreds more. Across London the weapons killed over 8900 civilians and injured over 24,000 more. These figures do not include the thousands of forces personnel who gave their lives in trying to stop the V weapons. Nor does it include the tens of thousands of prisoners who died in camps during the weapons construction.

Strategically the V weapons did contribute to delaying of the end of the war but their impact on morale in Britain was never enough to have any significant influence. Overall they are regarded as the final technological horror of Hitler’s Germany.

Some of the publications that contained information about the V weapons (details were heavily censored to avoid giving away any useful information to the enemy).

Some of the publications that contained information about the V weapons (details were heavily censored to avoid giving away any useful information to the enemy).

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